Thursday, May 5, 2016

#Notachamberopera (Or Painting A Story On The Largest Canvas Possible)

By Tomer Zvulun 

One of the most fascinating aspects of opera is the variations of musical styles within the art form itself. From Baroque to modern music, the art form runs the gamut of flavors, each of them uniquely defined by a different language, period, composers style, orchestra size, color, etc. As an Artistic Director, choosing the operas for a season is a little bit like selecting the perfect ice cream combination. 

How do you choose the perfect mix? Do you go for the classic, always potent chocolate-vanilla or is it time to try an adventurous churro and brambleberry crisp? (Yes, that’s a flavor at Jeni’s Ice Cream and it is life-changing.)

We are closing a uniquely diverse season at The Atlanta Opera: from the modern and powerful chamber opera, Soldier Songs, to a fresh cinematic version of La bohème, a colorful audience-pleaser in The Pirates of Penzance, to a visually striking Winterreise (Winter Journey). We offered our audiences many flavors and tastes this year.

We chose to close the season with the grandest version of the epic love story: Romeo and Juliet.

The first question is why?

Why did theaters all over the world, in every conceivable language, adapt this play? Why were the greatest artists of every period so drawn to retelling this familiar story? Why are we presenting it this weekend at the magnificent Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center?

All around the world, the name “Romeo and Juliet” is synonymous with the idea of being young and in love. It captures the essence of romance, of discovering the powers of love, sex, danger, and the mysterious alchemy of an attraction to another person. It is desperately romantic. It deals with love and loss, power and social status; the stuff that makes us all dream.

The second question is also why. Why this version when so many other versions exist?

The answer is SCALE. Gounod’s version is unique in that it takes a story which is often remembered for its intimate chamber scenes (The famous balcony scene, the tomb scene) and expands it to an unapologetically grand opera in the most extravagant way.

The extreme feelings that the characters experience - the ecstasy of falling in love and lust, the intensity of violence and loss, revenge, and grief - are the perfect materials for operatic tales.

Gounod takes those ingredients and propels them forward in a romantic, melodic way. He enhances the SCALE of the story and emotions by writing sweeping music for large choruses and orchestra.

Our version at The Atlanta Opera strategically takes the idea of larger than life themes and finds the visual equivalent in the backdrop of the Shakespearean Globe Theatre. Through the use of multiple towers, staircases and levels, this grand canvas helps give this powerful story new life.

Producing an opera is a complicated, exciting adventure that involves hundreds of singers, musicians, and technicians. I personally find it addictive because it allows us to paint on the largest canvas available in the performing arts. Producing GRAND opera, like Romeo and Juliet, is even more intricate and exciting.

This grand opera version of the story not only brings together a thrilling cast of singers, designers, musicians and artists from all over the world, but it is also the perfect way to close our delicious, diverse season at The Atlanta Opera. Hope you will join us!

Have a great summer and see you at Jeni’s Ice Cream!

- Tomer Zvulun

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